16 DAYS / 16 VIDEOS
AN EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM FEATURING A SELECTION OF VIDEOS BY CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS

September 9th through September 30th the Gary R. Libby University Gallery will be presenting a series of

video works as part of an educational Program. These videos have been drawn from private collections and

archives. The selection spans a wide historical frame and covers a range of interests and subject matter. It

is an opportunity for the students and our art community to revisit known and discover new artists.

DAY 1 / SEPTEMBER 9, 2022
FRANCIS ALŸS
THE NIGHTWATCH, LONDON, UK
2004 
IN COLLABORATION WITH RAFAEL ORTEGA AND ARTANGEL
17 MINUTES, 30 SECONDS

Francis Alÿs' The Nightwatch (an ironic reference to the celebrated painting by Rembrandt),

examines the nature of surveillance in the city. In the middle of the night, the artist released a fox into London's deserted National Portrait Gallery and used the museum's CCTV system to track the animal's movements. The gallery was chosen because, unlike other institutions, it does not hide its CCTV system but purposefully incorporates several monitors that capture spectators in its exhibition displays. The museum makes explicit the constant filming and surveillance of the public. Similarly, in its exhibition format, The Nightwatch offers the possibility of tracing the fox's movement sequentially from one monitor to the next, much like a security officer could with any individual in the city. The Nightwatch places the spectator as the voyeuristic overseer of the fox's walk, mirroring the relationship between London's surveillance system and the city's inhabitants.[1]Alÿs was inspired partly by the proliferation of surveillance cameras around London, and by the number of urban foxes forced to lead a scavenger existence in the city.

 

[1] https://www.artangel.org.uk/artwork/the-nightwatch/

DAY 2 / SEPTEMBER 10, 2022
FRANCESCA WOODMAN
SELECTED VIDEO WORKS
1975 -1978

In a long-standing tradition, in which Abramović and Mendieta were pioneers, another short-lived American artist, Francesca Woodman, also explores her traumas and frustrations through the use of the moving image. Like his predecessors, Woodman produced a series of works for cameras in which the body is both present and absent. One could say that her exploration is about the phantasmagoria of the body, a word that has the same Greek root as “appearance." In her work it is not merely accidental that the apparent (the visible) and the evanescent have the same linguistic origin. A body that is and is not is a body in the same state of conflict in which the video puts us, the conflict of a fleeting presence, in which all times are fused, in which memory captures itself as a fold: Borgesian paraphrasing the dreamer who dreams while dreaming, Woodman proposes the formula “remembering while remembering," which leads to this pleasurable, and at the same time traumatic, appearance of oblivion and the disappearance of being.

DAY 3 / SEPTEMBER 13, 2022
JIMMIE DURHAM
SMASHING
2004
91 MINUTES, 54 SECONDS

Wearing a suit, Jimmie Durham sits behind a desk like a bureaucrat performing his duty: smashing things.

In an orderly manner, a person goes in, delivers an object, Durham smashes it with a prehistoric stone

stool - violently but impassively. He stamps and signs a piece of paper as receipt and gives it to the same

person, who goes off-scene. The same order of events is repeated several times for 92 minutes. This video performance was part of Durham’s teaching residency at Fondazione Antonio Ratti in Como, Italy in 2004.

 

Since the 1980s, Jimmie Durham’s work has been characterized by an exploration on representations of the

other. Particularly, Durham has a trajectory marked by his ethnic origin, as he is of Native American

descent. His most emblematic works recover the artisanal and juxtapose it with the contemporary art

tradition of the found object to symbolically present the mutilation of indigenous cultural representations.

Considering this line of investigation, the formula used by Durham in his video Smashing may seem

strange. At first glance, it is a video which shows a character (the artist himself) in a peculiar exchange

operation: in exchange for a personal object to be destroyed by the character, each participant receives a

certificate. It might seem like a simple conceptual process: the initial reading might be that the object's

existence is purely abstract. But the comic setting, with the artist as a caricature of a frantic bureaucrat

who distributes identical certificates for different objects and to different people, is more than an

extension of the aesthetic administration, of which institutional art critique provides us with a broad

history. The violent decrepitude of the bureaucrat (played by the artist, let’s not forget) “smashing” the

objects he receives, points to something very significant: these objects, full of personal history to each of

the volunteers who decided to participate in this action or event, are leaving their nostalgia function

behind. This “bureaucratic” violent neglect that replaces the object, this memory loss, coincides with the

idea of the continuous present from which the narcissist is unable to escape.

DAY 4 / SEPTEMBER 14, 2022
MARINA ABRAMOVIC
NUDE WITH SKELETON
2002 - 2005
12 MINUTES, 36 SECONDS
+
ANA MENDIETA
UNTITLED (BUTTERFLY)
1975
3 MINUTES, 39 SECONDS

Marina Abramovic

The video Nude with skeleton by Serbian artist Marina Abramović is a work in a series based on the

“archaeological” discovery of human skeletons. In the video, the artist appears in communion with the

skeleton, and one reproduces the gesture of the other. This dance with death is evidently linked to a

political and personal context of turmoil in the Balkans. This is where the artist is from, and it is marked

by the traumas of a society that lowers the human spirit by leaving it caught in a bloody and incessant

battle for survival. The medium of video allows the artist to represent herself in a state of permanent

agony, reinforced by the display of an image repeated ad infinitum, condemning bodies and corpses to live

together intimately.

Ana Mendieta

Cuban-born artist Ana Mendieta is an important figure in contemporary performance art. Despite her short

life, her work gained international recognition. She was undoubtedly, albeit unintentionally, one of the

pioneers of the much-propagated multiculturalism, which has been succinctly described in art history as

the shifting interests from aesthetics to ethnographic concerns. In this untitled video, Mendieta presents a

facet that is perhaps not recognized as the most representative of her work, marked by the tensions

between the body and the landscape, in a call to return to what is essential in human nature. What is

special about this video in relation to her work is the absence of the natural landscape as the territory of

her inscriptions or silhouettes made with her own body in primitive clay. We must consider that this video

dates from a time when she was experiencing her body as a malleable support to produce meanings (the

body as raw material and support for her ideas), a type of approach close to that found in a famous

performance in which Mendieta presses her face against a glass, in a sequence that goes from the

agonizing to the ironic, until she transforms her own body into material for sculpture in action. In this

video, using a technique little explored until then, the artist uses an infrared sensor that measures the

heat of the human body to record her own figure. Thus, instead of glass, Mendieta symbolically “presses”

her body against the recording material. As was her custom, the artist appears naked in front of the

camera, but distorting the image so that we see it diffused between color zones. With the movement of

the body, we see how your abdomen, for example, changes from red to blue areas, and so does each of

your limbs. The artist's body became a palette of colors, objectified, again reflecting the conflicts of

excision of subject and object that the narcissist cannot understand.

DAY 5 / SEPTEMBER 15, 2022
DAVID LAMELAS + HILDEGARDE DUANE
MANILA RUN
1988
12 MINUTES, 42 SECONDS

With Manila Run (1987), Duane and Lamelas staged the decay of the interview format over the course of

the video. The artists made direct reference to specific individuals: Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos (again

portrayed by Lamelas and Duane, respectively), first couple of the Philippines and mouthpiece for Reagan’s

anticommunist foreign policy. In an initial sequence, the characters trumpet their populist slogans,

entirely appropriated from real quotations, before an unseen public. They dance and then flee the country

(Ferdinand steals cigarettes on his way out), after which the video flash forwards to a nuclear explosion in

1999. The interviewer (played by Mary Kahl), sick from radiation, visits the post-apocalyptic bunker where

Ferdinand and Imelda show off their furniture and medals—an abject version of the “news magazine”

home interview—until another explosion kills them all. Lamelas has suggested that identifying actual

political figures was a mistake, as it “ages the idea” (Newhouse). The direct appropriation of existing

media content also allows for a degree of political specificity that The Hand and The Dictator refuse. In

these earlier works, parody is conflated with generality; the real-life referents and political affiliations must

remain ambiguous. Manila Run, then, is the exception to Lamelas’s rule that politics dwell in media form

rather than its content.

[In Daniel r. Quiles Conversations: The Television Interview in Jaime Davidovich and David Lamelas , p. 195-

196]

DAY 6 / SEPTEMBER 16, 2022
PATRICIA DAUDER
FORWARD (FILM) AND
OTHER FILMS (2006 - 2012)
2010
16 MM. BLACK AND WHITE. NO SOUND.
6 MINUTES, 47 SECONDS

Other films

The Garden Island, 2012. 16 mm film. Color and black and white. No sound. 5 minutes, 43 seconds; March

5th, 1979, 2011. 16 mm film. Black and white. No sound. 4 minutes, 20 seconds; Flow, 2009. S8 film

transferred to 16 mm. Color. No sound. 4 minutes, 05 seconds; Sporadic, 2009. S8 film transferred to 16

mm. Color. No sound. 4 minutes, 25 seconds; Cutsurf (Bclnt. Fed.2009), 2009. S8 film transferred to 16

mm. Color. No sound. 1 minutes, 30 seconds; Les Maliens (a film), 2007. S16 mm film transferred to video.

Color. Sound. 12 minutes, 49 seconds; Les Maliens (a script), 2006. 16 mm film transferred to video. Color.

No sound. 3 minutes, 49 seconds

FORWARD (FILM)

"Forward (film) shows a series of landscape views and sport actions in a non-narrative, non-lineal, and

fragmented manner. The images were filmed during a 2009 Professional Windsurf Association World Cup

competition held at Pozo Izquierdo Beach in the Canary Islands, a well-known spot for windsurfing due to

its strong wind and wave conditions throughout the year. The film was made and edited with the idea to be

a faithful depiction of my spontaneous reactions to the place and the event as much as a true

cinematographic testimony of the rough environmental conditions that affected the shooting such as strong

gales, big swell and dense humidity in the air hindering clear vision"

The representation of a subject or an event, becomes almost a secondary aspect when viewing Patricia

Dauder's films. From the first moment, our attention is directed inevitably towards the perception of matter

and space and the experience of time. The artist's interest in working with spatial sensations, atmospheres

and topographies combined with a will to give visibility to the concept of absence has led to the nonrepresentation

of facts and the prominence of an experience of viewing and perceiving.

Dauder’s films explore what lies at the heart of the medium: time and length on the one hand and editing

on the other. Time seems to be suspended by the suppression of any sort of referential fact external to the

image. Therefore, the film has its own inherent time, a "suspended time" that the artist acknowledges as

characteristic of her working process. Although observation of the natural world is a constant practice and

a point of departure for many of her works, during the creative process, what's figurative or identifiable

fades to its mere disappearance becoming a slight trace, almost imperceptible.

DAY 7 / SEPTEMBER 17, 2022
LEANDRO KATZ
MOON FILMS. MOON NOTES
1980 - 2010
DIGITAL VIDEO FROM ORIGINAL
16 MM FILM
9 MINUTES, 34 SECONDS

Moon Notes is a ten-minute video in which a camera passively watches the Moon and compresses, in a

time lapse, a complete lunar cycle, leaving to the imagination of those who see it the possibility of

deciphering what happened in the intervals between each phase. In the beginning of the video a text

appears on the screen that says: “The tortuous nature of Our Progress.” A little further on, as soon as the

moon continues to ascend, the following text appears: “Camping on the Opposite Shore.” Lastly, the artist

launches this sentence: “White Rushes Tied to a Cluster of Mulberry Shoots.” These messages are, on the

one hand, an invitation for us, spectators, to write our own texts, our own reports, and, on the other

hand, they invite us to share a different time, that time of the communal sensations of our ancestors. A

time that the video allows the artist to summon as an eternal present.

DAY 8 / SEPTEMBER 20, 2022
CARLOS MARTIEL
PUNTO DI FUGA (VANISHING POINT)
2013
7 MINUTES, 7 SECONDS

“I stand in the center of the main hall of Nitsch Museum with woolen threads sewn to the front and back

of my body. The threads sewed to my back all follow the same direction to a single point on the wall. The

threads extending from my torso expand in many directions, creating the illusion that I’m being pierced by

a vanishing point.”

(Commissioned and produced by Fondazione Morra)

Eugenio Viola

https://kunstaspekte.art/event/carlos-martiel-vanishing-point-2013-03?hl=en

The “vanishing point” and the perspective elaboration thus implied are the expression of the will

to give the world a geometrical order produced by a western episteme aiming to rationalize it

through logic mathematics terms. They both belong to a doctrine based on the anthropocentric

concept of man as measure of the world, thus represented by Leonardo da Vinci in the Homo

Vitruvianus that becomes the extreme visualization of the Neoplatonic correspondence between

macrocosm and microcosm.

Starting from these considerations and dealing with a topical theme of western culture and history

of art, Carlos Martiel reverses the iconic outcome of the given image by using his body, he shows

the deviation from the model, from the platonic essence aiming at the original pureness as well as

the classic eidos in order to restore a version which is controversially multicultural and hybrid.

The artist’s body turns into a landscape to be crossed and covered, his skin becomes a painting to

be personalized and comprehended, his appendixes are branches with specific signs of belonging

just hanging on them: the meeting place for several different codes. Action is an effort of junction

which is translated into a geometrical-performative tension, into grief and nearly mantric ecstasy

of a body declined into its unshakable alterity.

In Carlos Martiel’s work, the context of belonging and the awareness of his own body are always

shown as being the mutable outcome of complex processes of attribution. The street and the

public place are his favourite field for acting and operating since they are granted by continuous

ways of repossession.

The Cuban artist is focused on specific episodes aiming to intensify the perception of social

inequalities by driving the public to adopt an ideological position which comprises signs of a

determined situation and precise context. As it often happens in the magmatic continent of South

America, Martiel’s actions are bound to a strong expressive vividness, they assume denouncing

overtones and a taste of rebellion, they recall unpleasant situations which are worrying signs of

the deep existential discomforts fought by contemporary society. His harsh and dramatic works are

characterized by a disturbing beauty and a nearly cathartic strength which drive them beyond the

contextual or sociological remark. His works, originated from a specific geopolitical localization,

proceed inductively from the particular to the general since they refer, against our will, to global

problems.

DAY 9 / SEPTEMBER 21, 2022
10 AM TO 2 PM
CANDICE BREITZ
PROFILE, 2017
3 SINGLE-CHANNEL VIDEOS, COLOUR, SOUND, LOOP
VARIATION A - DURATION: 2 MINUTES, 20 SECONDS
COMMISSIONED BY THE SOUTH AFRICAN PAVILION, VENICE BIENNALE 2017

Who speaks in the name of whom? In 2017, Candice Breitz represented her country of birth—South

Africa—at the 57th Venice Biennale; a country in which the question of who may (or may not)

legitimately occupy the space of representation, is particularly fraught. Recently, debates around the

extent to which white South Africans can engage, portray or stand in alliance with black South Africans,

have been amplified against the backdrop of a global right-wing backlash that seeks to reverse social

justice gains. Can would-be allies whose very being is defined by socio-historical privilege, avoid simply

entrenching such privilege as they endeavour to align themselves with communities who have been denied

this privilege? Such questions lie both at the heart of Breitz’s Love Story (2016), and at the core of Profile

(2017), a series of three short videos that respond to Breitz’s nomination as one of two artists selected to

represent South Africa in Venice in 2017 (her work was featured alongside that of compatriot Mohau

Modisakeng). In Profile, a work that was conceived and shot in Cape Town in early 2017, Breitz absents

herself from visibility before the camera, instead platforming ten prominent South African artists who

might equally have been nominated to represent the country. As their collective appearance usurps Breitz’s

presence, the implied selfportrait gives way to a polyphonic riff, imploding the very assumptions that

conventionally guarantee the genre of portraiture. “My name is Candice Breitz,” the cast of voices insists

intermittently, punctuating descriptions of who those before the camera actually are (or might be): man

or woman, white or black, working or middle class…. Veering erratically between descriptors of race, class

and gender, occupation and national belonging, the verbal palate of attributes and markers delivered by

the artists varies wildly in credibility. Who is here as a self and who is here as an other?

“I’m Candice Breitz, and I approve this message,” the multi-voiced litany concludes, parodying the

sentence that American presidential candidates are legally obliged to use as rhetorical authentication of

their campaign ads during an electoral cycle. In the context of Profile, however, the sentence subverts the

proof of authenticity it is supposed to furnish. Blurring the genre of self-portraiture with the formal

language of electoral politicking and self-promotional branding, Profile re-distributes the heightened

attention typically garnered by an artist due to a Venice appearance, to a range of fellow artists who –

much like Breitz – appear intent on consciously disrupting any fixed notion of subjectivity. Dodging

objectification, the artists featured in Profile confront the placatory ‘rainbow nation’ metaphor that is too

readily applied to post-apartheid South Africa, with the country’s lived reality. In so doing, they extricate

the question of who may legitimately speak for their nation in Venice from the regime of representation,

to prompt a debate around who should be able to speak in a discussion of the many who are not present

when they are being spoken for and about in Venice.

Profile features Igshaan Adams, Roger Ballen, Steven Cohen, Gabrielle Goliath, Dean Hutton, Banele Khoza,

Gerald Machona, Buhlebezwe Siwani, Chuma Sopotela and Sue Williamson. The work was commissioned by

the South African Pavilion on the occasion of the 57th edition of the Venice Biennale, with the support

of the South African Department of Arts and Culture and Connect Channel.

Text: Alexander Koch

2 PM TO 6 PM
CAO FEI
i. MIRROR BY CHINA TRACY (AKA: CAO FEI)
SECOND LIFE DOCUMENTARY FILM
2007
28 MINUTES, 8 SECONDS

Cao Fei is a Chinese artist living in Beijing. She is well known for her multimedia installations and her

videos, as well as work in which social aspects, popular aesthetics, references to surrealism, and

documentary conventions are mixed while reflecting on the rapid and chaotic changes taking place today

in her country. One of her recurring concerns is the erosion caused in the real world by the virtual world,

as she shows with her video i. Mirror by China Tracy (AKA: Cao Fei) Second Life Documentary Film . Second

Life is a virtual space that gained great popularity during the 2000’s and in which people can create

characters, spaces and situations that develop in a parallel simulated world. Each character or “avatar” (a

word derived from the Sanskrit term “divine incarnation”) refers to an alter ego that each one controls in

this game in which diverse people from all over the world coexist, such as activists, soldiers, businessmen,

chefs, truck drivers, executives, the disabled or television stars. Among them is Cao Fei, whose avatar is

i.Mirror, the story of a beautiful maiden created by China Tracy with machinima, a 3-D animation program.

China Tracy is actually Cao Fei and her Second Life story exudes the influences of filmmakers like Wim

Wenders. The video is a narration of i.Mirror’s life, divided into three related parts: the first part oscillates

between the beauty and excess of virtual capitalism. The second is mostly a love story, and all three

feature a montage of humanitarian avatars. The love story is based on real events and is almost a

documentary, just like other plots are fictional or mix fiction with reality. The important thing for the

artist is that, “as a background, there is a completely human nature” in this parallel virtual world. Second

Life is, in short, a laboratory for relationships. The difference between cinema or photography and digital

art is in terms of representation and not content and, therefore, we can compare it (as well as video) to a

mirror, as we do with painting. The difference, according to the clues we follow from Rosalind Krauss'

seminal text on the aesthetics of narcissism, is that, while in painting the artist seeks for the object to be

a reflection of himself and the environment, in video, or now in digital media, these reflections tend

towards the erasure of boundaries, which are increasingly difficult to define.

DAY 10 / SEPTEMBER 22, 2022
MUNTADAS / REESE
POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
1952 - 2008
85 MINUTES, 49 SECONDS

Artists Antoni Muntadas and Marshall Reese have been compiling a history of presidential campaign spots

following the evolution of political advertising from its beginnings in 1952 to the present. Political

Advertisement is a personal vision of how politics and politicians are presented through the medium of TV.

For the past six general elections, the artists premiered the latest version of the tape in a public

presentation, followed by a discussion about the impact of campaign advertising.

Muntadas and Reese first started working on this video project in 1984. This fascinating anthology

documents the selling of the American presidency since the 1950s. Surveying the American televisual

campaign process, the artists trace the history of television ads as political strategy and marketing

technique. Played in chronological order and without commentary, the ads become a chorus of the nation’s

patriotism, partisanship, and fear. The artists’ state: “Looking back at these political ads provides a key to

understanding the evolution of images on television and the marketing of politics.”

DAY 11 / SEPTEMBER 23, 2022
10 AM TO 2 PM
CANDICE BREITZ
PROFILE, 2017
3 SINGLE-CHANNEL VIDEOS, COLOUR, SOUND, LOOP
VARIATION B - DURATION: 3 MINUTES, 27 SECONDS
COMMISSIONED BY THE SOUTH AFRICAN PAVILION, VENICE BIENNALE 2017

Who speaks in the name of whom? In 2017, Candice Breitz represented her country of birth—South

Africa—at the 57th Venice Biennale; a country in which the question of who may (or may not)

legitimately occupy the space of representation, is particularly fraught. Recently, debates around the

extent to which white South Africans can engage, portray or stand in alliance with black South Africans,

have been amplified against the backdrop of a global right-wing backlash that seeks to reverse social

justice gains. Can would-be allies whose very being is defined by socio-historical privilege, avoid simply

entrenching such privilege as they endeavour to align themselves with communities who have been denied

this privilege? Such questions lie both at the heart of Breitz’s Love Story (2016), and at the core of Profile

(2017), a series of three short videos that respond to Breitz’s nomination as one of two artists selected to

represent South Africa in Venice in 2017 (her work was featured alongside that of compatriot Mohau

Modisakeng). In Profile, a work that was conceived and shot in Cape Town in early 2017, Breitz absents

herself from visibility before the camera, instead platforming ten prominent South African artists who

might equally have been nominated to represent the country. As their collective appearance usurps Breitz’s

presence, the implied selfportrait gives way to a polyphonic riff, imploding the very assumptions that

conventionally guarantee the genre of portraiture. “My name is Candice Breitz,” the cast of voices insists

intermittently, punctuating descriptions of who those before the camera actually are (or might be): man

or woman, white or black, working or middle class…. Veering erratically between descriptors of race, class

and gender, occupation and national belonging, the verbal palate of attributes and markers delivered by

the artists varies wildly in credibility. Who is here as a self and who is here as an other?

“I’m Candice Breitz, and I approve this message,” the multi-voiced litany concludes, parodying the

sentence that American presidential candidates are legally obliged to use as rhetorical authentication of

their campaign ads during an electoral cycle. In the context of Profile, however, the sentence subverts the

proof of authenticity it is supposed to furnish. Blurring the genre of self-portraiture with the formal

language of electoral politicking and self-promotional branding, Profile re-distributes the heightened

attention typically garnered by an artist due to a Venice appearance, to a range of fellow artists who –

much like Breitz – appear intent on consciously disrupting any fixed notion of subjectivity. Dodging

objectification, the artists featured in Profile confront the placatory ‘rainbow nation’ metaphor that is too

readily applied to post-apartheid South Africa, with the country’s lived reality. In so doing, they extricate

the question of who may legitimately speak for their nation in Venice from the regime of representation,

to prompt a debate around who should be able to speak in a discussion of the many who are not present

when they are being spoken for and about in Venice.

Profile features Igshaan Adams, Roger Ballen, Steven Cohen, Gabrielle Goliath, Dean Hutton, Banele Khoza,

Gerald Machona, Buhlebezwe Siwani, Chuma Sopotela and Sue Williamson. The work was commissioned by

the South African Pavilion on the occasion of the 57th edition of the Venice Biennale, with the support

of the South African Department of Arts and Culture and Connect Channel.

Text: Alexander Koch

2 PM TO 6 PM
REGINA SILVEIRA  
UMA TRAMAZUL
2010
12 MINUTES, 36 SECONDS

In 2010, the Brazilian plastic artist Regina Silveira packed the Museu de Arte de São Paulo facade with a

work specially designed for the museum. A digital image on adhesive vinyl, the work fully covered the

museum's external glass in the length and height of its four facades. In total, the covered area was 2,300

m. In Tramazul the image is of a blue sky with light clouds, close to the images of skies that are naturally

reflected in the glass of the buildings, with the difference that it is constructed as a gigantic cross-stitch

embroidery. In these skies spread over the four sides of the museum, large needles virtually embedded in a

weft of intense blue simulate embroidering the clouds scattered across the glass, with threads of three

shades – between white and medium gray. Tramazul proposes itself as a false reflection and at the same

time as a camouflage that connects MASP's embroidered sky with other neighboring skies, real or reflected,

in a unique example of public or urban art. Tramazul redefined the structure's heavy modernist

architecture, lightening it to include an idyllic reflection of nature.

Regina Silveira is internationally known for works that interfere in spaces and buildings, inside and outside

them, such as the installation Lumen (2005) that covered the Crystal Palace of the Museo Nacional Centro

de Arte Reina Sofía, in Madrid; Tropel Reversed (2009), 700 mÇ adhesive vinyl on the Køge Art Museum,

Denmark; the Entrecéu installations , at the Vale Museum, in Espírito Santo (2007); Claralight, at the

Centro Cultural Banco do Brasil, in São Paulo (2003).

[1] https://masp.org.br/exposicoes/tramazul

DAY 12 / SEPTEMBER 24, 2022
DARA FRIEDMAN
THE CROWNING
2021
5 MINUTES, 16 SECONDS

Dara Friedman’s new digital commission, The Crowning (2021), explores the ancient and ever-renewed form

of the spiral through moving images, layering, color, and sound. Filmed on 35 mm film and transferred to

video, the spiral, as both movement and shape, is engaged through the imagery depicted—the elliptical

trajectory of the sun as it rises out of and sets back into the ocean; the merging of the human eye and

astral bodies—but also formally, as images seamlessly transition across split frames and in subtle shifts of

color and sound. With this work, Friedman foregrounds local history and alludes to how, for the Calusa, an

Indigenous population of southwest Florida, the pupil was a portal to the soul. In this work, the meanings

of the spiral are manifold, speaking to complex notions of nonlinear time, foldings of the past and future

into the present.

MANDORLA
2022
35MM FILM TRANSFERRED TO 4K VIDEO, SOUND
10 MINUTES, 43 SECONDS

In Mandorla, a form of neolithic sun-gazing compresses deep time and the momentary. The bright spiraling

orbs chance intersection, their fleeting meetings revealing the cosmological symbol of the vesica Pisces.

Occasionally a panther laps water, her tail curling and uncurling, locking eyes with the viewer’s. Small

boats flit by in animated jitters of nowness. An unsynchronized soundtrack of gong and violin notes allows

space for the sound waves to lap haphazardly like ripples of water.

DAY 13 / SEPTEMBER 27, 2022
10 AM TO 2 PM
CANDICE BREITZ
PROFILE, 2017
3 SINGLE-CHANNEL VIDEOS, COLOUR, SOUND, LOOP
VARIATION C - DURATION: 3 MINUTES, 21 SECONDS
COMMISSIONED BY THE SOUTH AFRICAN PAVILION, VENICE BIENNALE 2017

Who speaks in the name of whom? In 2017, Candice Breitz represented her country of birth—South

Africa—at the 57th Venice Biennale; a country in which the question of who may (or may not)

legitimately occupy the space of representation, is particularly fraught. Recently, debates around the

extent to which white South Africans can engage, portray or stand in alliance with black South Africans,

have been amplified against the backdrop of a global right-wing backlash that seeks to reverse social

justice gains. Can would-be allies whose very being is defined by socio-historical privilege, avoid simply

entrenching such privilege as they endeavour to align themselves with communities who have been denied

this privilege? Such questions lie both at the heart of Breitz’s Love Story (2016), and at the core of Profile

(2017), a series of three short videos that respond to Breitz’s nomination as one of two artists selected to

represent South Africa in Venice in 2017 (her work was featured alongside that of compatriot Mohau

Modisakeng). In Profile, a work that was conceived and shot in Cape Town in early 2017, Breitz absents

herself from visibility before the camera, instead platforming ten prominent South African artists who

might equally have been nominated to represent the country. As their collective appearance usurps Breitz’s

presence, the implied selfportrait gives way to a polyphonic riff, imploding the very assumptions that

conventionally guarantee the genre of portraiture. “My name is Candice Breitz,” the cast of voices insists

intermittently, punctuating descriptions of who those before the camera actually are (or might be): man

or woman, white or black, working or middle class…. Veering erratically between descriptors of race, class

and gender, occupation and national belonging, the verbal palate of attributes and markers delivered by

the artists varies wildly in credibility. Who is here as a self and who is here as an other?

“I’m Candice Breitz, and I approve this message,” the multi-voiced litany concludes, parodying the

sentence that American presidential candidates are legally obliged to use as rhetorical authentication of

their campaign ads during an electoral cycle. In the context of Profile, however, the sentence subverts the

proof of authenticity it is supposed to furnish. Blurring the genre of self-portraiture with the formal

language of electoral politicking and self-promotional branding, Profile re-distributes the heightened

attention typically garnered by an artist due to a Venice appearance, to a range of fellow artists who –

much like Breitz – appear intent on consciously disrupting any fixed notion of subjectivity. Dodging

objectification, the artists featured in Profile confront the placatory ‘rainbow nation’ metaphor that is too

readily applied to post-apartheid South Africa, with the country’s lived reality. In so doing, they extricate

the question of who may legitimately speak for their nation in Venice from the regime of representation,

to prompt a debate around who should be able to speak in a discussion of the many who are not present

when they are being spoken for and about in Venice.

Profile features Igshaan Adams, Roger Ballen, Steven Cohen, Gabrielle Goliath, Dean Hutton, Banele Khoza,

Gerald Machona, Buhlebezwe Siwani, Chuma Sopotela and Sue Williamson. The work was commissioned by

the South African Pavilion on the occasion of the 57th edition of the Venice Biennale, with the support

of the South African Department of Arts and Culture and Connect Channel.

Text: Alexander Koch

2 PM TO 6 PM
CLAUDIO PERNA
LA COSA  (MEDANOS) [THE THING (SAND DUNES)] (NO SOUND)
1972
7 MINUTES, 14 SECONDS

Geography is more than space, more than cartography and delimitation; geographic space is a living being

where anything can happen. This video shows us a canvas with an abstract geometric design – a checkered

canvas, by the Venezuelan artist Eugenio Espinoza – that different people are moving, without a defined

direction, on the dunes of Médanos de Coro National Park, in Venezuela. In this way, the work speaks to

us, firstly, of the artists' interaction with the geometric and, secondly, of the transformation of space into

a gesture, into a symbol, when we interrupt their daily life or when we realize that, if the human is a type

of landscape, the landscape also has a certain humanity, it is a being in itself.

URBANO / RURAL (NO SOUND)
1976
30 MINUTES, 10 SECONDS

Another video by Perna, Urbano/Rural, also documents his exploration of the country’s geography.

According to Silvia Benedetti: “The encounters between geography and art in Perna’s oeuvre primarily

focus on the Venezuelan territory, as he constantly and tirelessly worked to grasp every aspect of the

country and its national identity as a way to understand his own individuality. His investigations amount

to the search for heimat (home) that occupied him throughout his life.”

Perna's Urbano/Rural video piece is charged with the local geopolitical landscape, focusing on displacement

from rural to urban areas, which is a process parallel to the changes in artistic practices (from landscape to

modernist geometric art). Urbano/Rural is made up of two films initially shot in super 8, where rural and

urban life are recorded. In the installation (or spatialized) version of this work, urban and rural images are

projected onto a gentleman's suit and a guayabera, respectively. It is a type of pioneering operation in the

context of contemporary Latin American art, where few artists of Perna's generation used avant-garde

languages (such as documentary film) mixed with native themes.

TRICOLOR (NO SOUND)
1973
1 MINUTE, 45 SECONDS
DAY 14 / SEPTEMBER 28, 2022
LONGITUD DE ONDAS (1)
SELECTIONS FROM A VIDEO SHOW ORGANIZED BY JESUS FUENMAYOR
IN 1998
44 MINUTES, 20 SECONDS (ENTIRE PROGRAM)
JOSE ANTONIO HERNANDEZ-DIEZ
SINDROME FRESKOLITA
1997
10 MINUTES

In the years that Hernández-Diez made this work, he concentrated on collecting images of an intimate

dimension. In his persistent effort to translate into a formal language, experiences that belong to the

memories of childhood and adolescence, the artist produced works such as the video Freskolita Syndrome ,

in which he himself is shown throwing a constant stream of the popular soda drink in an obvious reference

to the work Fountain by Bruce Nauman. Perhaps what the artist proposes is a metaphorical way to talk

about the deceits we use to calm the anguish that afflicts us, and expose that empty being that prevails in

our contemporaneity.

MARTHA ROSIER
SEMIOTICS OF THE KITCHEN
1975
6 MINUTES, 9 SECONDS

Performance of the artist for the camera in which she is presenting and naming at the same time different

kitchen utensils with an expression of rage and irony that evidences the condition of social subjugation of

women. The contrast of Rosler's gestures with the stereotypes of permissible behavior in the domestic

environment, accentuates the highly codified nature of the relationship between utensils and femininity

and its dialectic with systems of oppression.

PETER CAMPUS
THREE TRANSACTIONS
1973
COLOR
4 MINUTES, 53 SECONDS

Campus appears in this video, in three sequences. In the first we can see him going through a wall and

through his own body. In the second it appears, thanks to technological gadgets, that he is erasing his

face only to show it again, and in the last image, his face is burned, dramatizing through the video the

distressing impossibility of escaping ourselves.

JAVIER TELLEZ
LA NORMA
1997
COLOR
10 MINUTES

The video shows the artist boxing in front of the camera, partially naked with a hat and a cigarette in his

mouth, as if he were embodying a gangster. In the soundtrack of the video, we hear the soprano María

Callas leading Pamela Herbert in a singing class, singing Bellini's aria “Casta Diva.” We see the boxer

synchronizing his pugilistic movements with the interpretation offered by the student, interrupting them

when Callas makes her critical remarks. In this way the singing "cathedra" is transformed into a boxing

lesson. The degraded artist is the protagonist.

STAN DOUGLAS
I AM NOT GARY (MONODRAMAS)
1991
COLOR
30 SECONDS

The Monodramas are a series of videos that the artist conceived to be broadcast in the same space as

television commercials. In I am not Gary , a video that, like all Monodramas, preserves the dramatic

structure of regular television programming in contrast to its short duration, recounts the encounter

between two men, one white and one black, the first of whom confuses the second with an acquaintance.

Douglas seeks to interrupt the habits of the audience, accustomed as they are to meekly submitting to

mass media messages.

CHERYL DONEGAN
CRAFT
1994
COLOR
6 MINUTES

Using extremely precarious sculpting material, such as thin slices of bread, Donegan appears in the video

creating fragilely composed art objects. His compositions are quite elementary, and, in his use of them,

childish.The extreme innocence of the objects that seem to be the product of a preschool exercise

contradicts the perversion of a medium such as video, one of whose virtues is its promiscuity.

THOMAS GLASSFORD
BESO AUTOGOL (AUTORRETRATO X2)
1995
HI 8, COLOR
1 MINUTE, 10 SECONDS

With a videography that includes works such as the cathodic image showing a rotating gourd-shaped

mirror, Glassford’s work is characterized by a humorous investigation into the problems of autoerotism.

The work Beso Autogol is a video in which the artist appears kissing himself in a mirror.

CARLOS CASTILLO
INTENTO DE VUELO FALLIDO
1982
30 SECONDS

In the video Failed Flight Attempt , Castillo throws a movie camera into the void from the tallest building

in the city (the towers of Parque Central in Caracas). Instead of the gentle mirror, our gaze is fixed on the

void, a vertiginous void. Thirty short seconds is the time we have to build an identity. One of the

strongest metaphors to understand the contemporary individual in the context of their urban and media

relations.

DAY 15 / SEPTEMBER 29, 2022
LONGITUD DE ONDAS (2)
SELECTIONS FROM A VIDEO SHOW ORGANIZED BY JESUS FUENMAYOR
IN 1998
56 MINUTES, 50 SECONDS (ENTIRE PROGRAM)
CHRIS BURDEN
VELVET WATER
1971
5 MINUTES

This documentary video of a performance shows the interest that Burden expresed during the seventies in

problems such as the psychological experience of danger, pain and physical risk, the aggressive abuse of

the body as an artistic object and the exploration of the artist-spectator relationship psychology. In the

video Burden emulates some of his best-known actions, such as the famous performance in which he

appears as the target of a shotgun-wielding assailant or when he “crucified” himself to a car. Velvet Water

shows Burden trying to breathe underwater, or as he himself says, “trying to extract oxygen from the

water”, in an action that, due to its long duration, drives viewers to exasperation.

GABRIEL OROZCO
BEFORE THE WAITING DOG
1993
15 MINUTES

Originally made as a personal record, this video was recorded during sessions in supermarkets that the

artist conceives for the camera. The video is a “documentary” record, like that in quotes, because although

it adheres to the “realistic” domestic quality, as is usual in creators who want to privilege the idea over the

form, it nevertheless invites us to a revelation product of an extremely simple operation. The artist

recorded the video carrying the camera on his back, pointing it in the opposite direction to his path: in

this way the objective and subjective point of view converge (the artist stripped of his entity and

materiality).

CARLOS JULIO MOLINA
HOW DO YOU SAY GOODBYE?
1993
HI 8, COLOR
5 MINUTES

A camera is filmed as it focuses on us, waiting for the right moment to photograph us, while we listen to a

radio commentator and the song “How do you say goodbye?” Reflected in the center of the camera lens is

an eye looking directly at the other camera. Molina places the subject between the two objectives of the

cameras, one, the photographic, frontal, threatening, and the other, the videographic and hidden,

occupying the place of the spectator.

JOSE GABRIEL FERNANDEZ
HOTEL ARIZONA
1998
COLOR CORTESFA DEL ARTISTA
8 MINUTES

The video shows three disks projected through a pink filter, organized somewhat like a traffic light, where

images alternating images appear and dissolve. Each circle describes a segment-detail of the ceremonial

bullfighting attire. The lower disk shows the “boy” or assistant putting the shoe on the matador and

adjusting the sock to his leg, almost like a caress that closes with the mooring of the males. The central

disc reveals a segment of the matador buttoning his satchel and the assistant begins to hug him from

behind to adjust the ribbon-tie around his waist. The upper disc describes the segment of the assistant

adjusting the matador's tie and sewing his shirt. The video is accompanied by a track with two songs by

Toña La Negra. All the sequences take place in privacy, in an erotically charged space. According to

Fernández, it is he himself who hides behind the lens. The images on each disc are slightly distorted to

mimic how the world is perceived through the magic eye.

GARY HILL
MEDIATIONS
1979/1986
COLOR
4 MINUTES, 30 SECONDS

In Mediations , an omnipresent voice emitted through a speakerphone defines its electronic existence as

the very relationship with the viewer, while a hand throws sand on the speaker until it completely covers

it andchanges the tone of the voice. Hill is one of the contemporary masters who have given continuity to

the work of Samuel Beckett and his characters, who struggled in failed attempts to find meaning in

existence.

OTTO BERCHEM
HAND CATCHING SPANISH SAUSAGE
1995
COLOR
3 MINUTES

A hand desperately tries to grasp a slippery Spanish sausage. Among the multiple possibilities of

interpretation (this assumption is one of them), the metaphor of trial and error could be mentioned,

which is simultaneously accompanied by the impossibility of a physical event repeating itself exactly the

same even when the conditions are identical. The work is also a parody of Richard Serra’s infamous 1968

film of a hand trying to catch a piece of lead.

DIANA LOPEZ
QUESCULTURA
1993
HI 8, COLOR
COLECCION IGNACIO Y VALENTINA OBERTO, CARACAS

7 MINUTES

In the video QUESCULTURA, López appears from behind in a beauty salon while a professional hairdresser's

works on her hair. Without her identity being obvious, the long tradition of the artist placed at the center

of the work allows us to conjecture her presence. The main interest is focused on the idea of hiring

someone else to do the physical aspect of the work, and also to include the artist's idea of beauty in the

registry, through the comments of the hairdressing professionals. QUESCULTURA (it can be read

alternatively as What is culture? or What sculpture!) is also one of the rare works of its time and context,

where the sociological phenomenon of the "victims of fashion" is addressed.

STAN DOUGLAS
UP (MONODRAMAS)
1991
COLOR
30 SECONDS

Like the others in the same series of Monodramas, this video was conceived to be broadcast on television.

It shows three characters sitting on a bench and a hand in the lower right corner of the screen. An

authoritative voice orders them to get up; that voice that orders, possibly from a policeman, is also the

voice of the one who hides behind the camera, that of the author, him who reorganizes the composition

of the image.

GEORGE HOLLIDAY
GEORGE HOLLIDAY'S VIDEOTAPE OF THE
RODNEY KING BEATING

1991
HI 8, COLOR
10 MINUTES

 

This video, infamous and famous, could be considered an antecedent of a new documentary form. In this

document, Holliday recorded an ephemeral event that would otherwise have gone unnoticed by most: the

beating that the Los Angeles police gave to Rodney King, whose identity, from this fateful moment,

became part of our imaginary of contemporary horror.

CARLOS CASTILLO
INTENTO DE VUELO FALLIDO
1982

30 SECONDS

In the video Failed Flight Attempt , Castillo throws a movie camera into the void from the tallest building

in the city (the towers of Parque Central in Caracas). Instead of the gentle mirror, our gaze is fixed on the

void, a vertiginous void. Thirty short seconds is the time we have to build an identity. One of the

strongest metaphors to understand the contemporary individual in the context of their urban and media

relations.

BONUS TRACK
DANIEL GONZALEZ
EL HOMBRE COMO FIN [THE MAN AS THE END]

8 MINUTES, 24 SECONDS

"Instant images projected fleetingly on an unstable and mobile surface, describe the urban chaos of the

population of Caracas in the 1960s. An incipient cosmopolitan city, subjected to the alienating

maladjustment of an environment convulsed by a complex political and social crisis. Enduring flashes of

neon, reflectors and flashing directional lights, like a night mirror of the city, an elastic uterus shakes and

contracts with interrupted spasms, trying to expel, what moves and carries submerged deep inside.

Surprisingly and unexpectedly, this altered thing breaks free, and an anxious, throbbing, distraught

humanoid being rushes out." Daniel Gonzalez

El Hombre como Fin is a video in which images of industrial processes, urban landscapes, and a type of

man-chrysalis are in dialogue. At the end of the narrative, the man finally breaks free and dances. With

this suggestion, which combines visual and performance arts, González touches on one of the fundamental

points in the understanding of modernity as an ontological plane: the need for the supremacy of the

human in relation to the era of mechanization, the affirmation of the individual in the face of an era that

becomes marginalized and outdated. The presence of hands, a frequent image in the video, is a sign that

can be read as an invitation to return to oneself, to the manual not as a form of work, but as an identity:

the way we manufacture and make ourselves and we manufacture and make our own reality.

DAY 16 / SEPTEMBER 30, 2022
SERGIO VEGA
PARADISE: REWIRED
41 MINUTES, 14 SECONDS

In Paradise: Rewired , video recording becomes a vehicle for empirical observation as the artist wanders

aimlessly throughout the back roads of Mato Grosso. There is no production team or script, only an old

map and the traveling cameraman determined to record his experiences and observations while searching

for signs of paradise. He is in search of the Garden of Eden in the center of South America as described by

Antonio de Leon Pinelo in his theory from 1650. Thus, the work is constructed as a space of thought in

which chronological time overlaps with the timelessness of myth, history, memory, and literature.

Paradise: Rewired begins by interpreting the western myth of Paradise as illustrating the constitution of

the Lacanian symbolic order and continues with the medieval scholastic order of the world (Dante), from

which nature emerges constructed as an archive in the Aristotelian fashion.

From the peculiar array of empirical source materials collected in the form of video clips, the artist draws

in numerous artistic and philosophical references. A passage ponders the currency of Parmenides'

conception of the nature of reality as an ontological condition irreconcilable with subjective interpretation

and representation. This notion is then confronted with an exploration of perception as phenomenological

in stream of consciousness and what the artist calls the filmic act. James Joyce's conception of the

cognitive functions specific to the modalities of the visible and of the audible are considered in relation to

the body (among other bodies) in contrast to disembodiment as in Joyce's notion of the diaphanous.

Terrestrial Paradise is thus constructed as a mode of being derived from the subject's state of heightened

perception and self-reflection interacting with the multiplicity of life forms that coexist in the Forest.